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grecolaborativo

art collaboration, textile art, costumes, installations, video, conceptual art and social practice art

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Jul
19th
Sat
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robertogreco:

A few years ago, when the media was reporting about “the endangered state of California,” we screen-printed some shirts with the bear from the flag of the state of California on them. The shirts were gray and the ink we used matched the color of the shirts making the bears intentionally difficult to see. We followed the shirts with a reproduction of the Bear Flag using a gray-blue fabric for each component and allowing the edges of each component to fray. It was a reminder that our state is always a blank slate and that as citizens we have a choice in what our state is and what it can and will be.

That flag led to a series of flags that do some or all of the following, but are still recognizable as the California flag:

  • rearrange or reposition the components (star, bear, ground, stripe)
  • recolor or retexture (through fabric choices) the components
  • resize or re-proportion the components overall or in relation to each other
  • remove components
  • use anagrams of CALIFORNIA REPUBLIC
  • reproduce another historic California flag

When we travel and when people visit us in our home, the flags are often shared and a conversation ensues about the diverse past, present, and imagined futures of our state. People play with the components of the flag and we inevitably create new flags as a result of their ideas. We call this project Californias, a conversation about our collective hopes and dreams for the place that we have called home for over twenty-two years. These are parallel Californias, Parallelifornias that coexist in time and space. They are not a call for splitting the state that we love for all its contrasts, its imperfections, and its beauty. It’s exactly the opposite, an appreciation for our California, simultaneously one and infinite.

We have several more flags in the works and we’re always on the lookout for ideas. If you would like to be part of this conversation, please contact us with your thoughts. Last year, Sophia and Enzo made a Scratch project that allows you to move around the components of the flag. It’s not the same as sketching or playing with fabrics, but if you make something you like with it, please take a screenshot and share it with us.

Grecolaborativo

Jul
1st
Tue
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Hot Head - custom order

Hot Head - custom order

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Jun
16th
Mon
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unconsumption:


McMurdo Station embraces ‘skua’ culture of recycling and reusing materialsOne of the quirky aspects of life at McMurdo Station External U.S. government site – the largest research base in the U.S. Antarctic Program (USAP) External U.S. government site, with a summer-time population of about 850 people – is Skua.
Skua is a concept. It is a noun and a verb. In prosaic terms, it is Goodwill meets the free box. Poetically, some describe it as a karmic recycling of goods.
“Skua is a big part of the culture,” says Kate Austin, a communications operator at MacOps, the communications center for USAP field operations, during a visit to Skua Central, a 300-square-foot shack on the edge of McMurdo where unwanted clothing, electronics and other sundry items go to await new owners.
“What I like about Skua is the whole attitude in the program of making do,” she says. …
Skuas are a group of seabirds, with the brown skua and south polar skua calling the Antarctic home. Related to gulls, skuas are opportunistic predators and scavengers. A few of the large birds are never far from McMurdo, ever on the lookout for an easy meal, requiring station personnel to lock down food waste bins and to remain vigilant when walking outdoors with a plate of cookies in hand.
The birds have lent their name to Skua Central, the repository where Austin is reorganizing jeans, boots, wool hats, blenders and even food stuff and cosmetics.
The word has also entered the local vocabulary. If you “skua” something, you either found an item or released it into the stream of free goods. Some people go “skuaing” – searching out a specific item or just going on a general hunt through the skua treasure trove.
Skua Central is at the end of the flow of discarded items – the reservoir into which various streams from the dorms and tri-wall containers around McMurdo eventually empty. The station’s Waste Department handles skua items along with the dozen or more different categories of waste.
About 65 percent of all trash from McMurdo and South Pole stations is eventually recycled. 

More: The Antarctic Sun: News about Antarctica - The Ultimate Free Box
Via BoingBoing.

unconsumption:

McMurdo Station embraces ‘skua’ culture of recycling and reusing materials

One of the quirky aspects of life at McMurdo Station External U.S. government site – the largest research base in the U.S. Antarctic Program (USAP) External U.S. government site, with a summer-time population of about 850 people – is Skua.

Skua is a concept. It is a noun and a verb. In prosaic terms, it is Goodwill meets the free box. Poetically, some describe it as a karmic recycling of goods.

“Skua is a big part of the culture,” says Kate Austin, a communications operator at MacOps, the communications center for USAP field operations, during a visit to Skua Central, a 300-square-foot shack on the edge of McMurdo where unwanted clothing, electronics and other sundry items go to await new owners.

“What I like about Skua is the whole attitude in the program of making do,” she says. …

Skuas are a group of seabirds, with the brown skua and south polar skua calling the Antarctic home. Related to gulls, skuas are opportunistic predators and scavengers. A few of the large birds are never far from McMurdo, ever on the lookout for an easy meal, requiring station personnel to lock down food waste bins and to remain vigilant when walking outdoors with a plate of cookies in hand.

The birds have lent their name to Skua Central, the repository where Austin is reorganizing jeans, boots, wool hats, blenders and even food stuff and cosmetics.

The word has also entered the local vocabulary. If you “skua” something, you either found an item or released it into the stream of free goods. Some people go “skuaing” – searching out a specific item or just going on a general hunt through the skua treasure trove.

Skua Central is at the end of the flow of discarded items – the reservoir into which various streams from the dorms and tri-wall containers around McMurdo eventually empty. The station’s Waste Department handles skua items along with the dozen or more different categories of waste.

About 65 percent of all trash from McMurdo and South Pole stations is eventually recycled. 

More: The Antarctic Sun: News about Antarctica - The Ultimate Free Box

Via BoingBoing.

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Embroidery and Heavy Metal

3,000 embroidered frames to make a music video.

Embroidery and Heavy Metal

3,000 embroidered frames to make a music video.

Jun
12th
Thu
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Jun
6th
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Jun
3rd
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robertogreco:

Untitled, Sophia Greco, 2014


  The idea behind my entry for the MCASD 25 and Under contest was set off by a conversation about how language affects culture and the way we perceive (or see) the world. This happens in ways both small (for example, the way verbs and tense are used) and large (for example, how some Australian Aboriginal languages have no term for “left” and “right” and instead, everything is spoken about using terms for cardinal directions - “north”, “south”, “east”, and “west”.)
  
  These ideas led me to ask a question. The traditional Snellen chart, which you will likely recognize, is used by many to measure visual acuity. How is it different in countries that do not primarily use the Latin alphabet, and what does it look like? Starting from the top and going clockwise, the languages used in the Snellen eye charts are as follows: Hebrew, Cyrillic, Chinese, Korean, English, Japanese, Cherokee and Arabic/Urdu. Finally, in the center of my creation is a chart often used to test astigmatism. Astigmatism is a very common eye condition that causes blurred vision.
  
  For more information about these interactions between language and perception, see the work of Lera Boroditsky.


This work will be on display with the other 24 finalists at MCASD's Downtown location on Saturday, June 7 from 2:00-4:00 pm. For more information see 25 and Under Showcase.

robertogreco:

Untitled, Sophia Greco, 2014

The idea behind my entry for the MCASD 25 and Under contest was set off by a conversation about how language affects culture and the way we perceive (or see) the world. This happens in ways both small (for example, the way verbs and tense are used) and large (for example, how some Australian Aboriginal languages have no term for “left” and “right” and instead, everything is spoken about using terms for cardinal directions - “north”, “south”, “east”, and “west”.)

These ideas led me to ask a question. The traditional Snellen chart, which you will likely recognize, is used by many to measure visual acuity. How is it different in countries that do not primarily use the Latin alphabet, and what does it look like? Starting from the top and going clockwise, the languages used in the Snellen eye charts are as follows: Hebrew, Cyrillic, Chinese, Korean, English, Japanese, Cherokee and Arabic/Urdu. Finally, in the center of my creation is a chart often used to test astigmatism. Astigmatism is a very common eye condition that causes blurred vision.

For more information about these interactions between language and perception, see the work of Lera Boroditsky.

This work will be on display with the other 24 finalists at MCASD's Downtown location on Saturday, June 7 from 2:00-4:00 pm. For more information see 25 and Under Showcase.

Jun
2nd
Mon
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Sometimes the player created a small, private world that was soft and warm and simple. Sometimes hard, and cold, and complicated.
— The Game That Conquered the World. What is the appeal of Minecraft? It’s the limitless creation of one’s own reality by James Parker (via @faketv)

(Source: The Atlantic)

May
29th
Thu
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California Rorschach

California Rorschach

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Chinafornia

Chinafornia

May
28th
Wed
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Renate Müller: Toys + Design

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Honoring the tradition of German toymakers from the 1800s, Renate Müller is renowned for her handmade jute-and-leather toys—typically animals—which she began designing and producing in the early 1960s. Müller has spent her life in Sonneberg, Germany, which was once the epicenter of world toy manufacture. From an early age, she helped out in her family’s toy factory and later became a student at the Sonneberg Polytechnic for Toy Design, where she was encouraged by a teacher to create toy animals that could be used therapeutically for children with physical and mental handicaps. Inspired by this endeavor, Müller began to create the brightly colored, multi-sized menagerie she is known for today—such as seals, elephants, giraffes, and bears—which debuted at the 1967 Leipzig Trade Fair and were tested (and deemed successful) by German psychiatric hospitals and clinics.

Honoring the tradition of German toymakers from the 1800s, Renate Müller is renowned for her handmade jute-and-leather toys—typically animals—which she began designing and producing in the early 1960s. Müller has spent her life in Sonneberg, Germany, which was once the epicenter of world toy manufacture. From an early age, she helped out in her family’s toy factory and later became a student at the Sonneberg Polytechnic for Toy Design, where she was encouraged by a teacher to create toy animals that could be used therapeutically for children with physical and mental handicaps. Inspired by this endeavor, Müller began to create the brightly colored, multi-sized menagerie she is known for today—such as seals, elephants, giraffes, and bears—which debuted at the 1967 Leipzig Trade Fair and were tested (and deemed successful) by German psychiatric hospitals and clinics.

May
14th
Wed
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A mis-printed jet-pack bunny is so much trash (unless I buy a second machine like a Filabot to remelt my filament). A mis-sewn seam can be ripped out and redone. An old dress can be refashioned into a new one. A favorite vintage piece can be copied. Sewing does not create more waste but, potentially, less, and the process of sewing is filled with opportunities for increasing one’s skills and doing it over as well as doing it yourself. What are quilts, after all, but a clever way to use every last scrap of precious fabric?
— 3D Printers Have a Lot to Learn from Sewing Machines by Alexandra Lange (via Dezeen)

(Source: dezeen.com)

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One And Only Dolly

One And Only Dolly