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grecolaborativo

art collaboration, textile art, costumes, installations, video, conceptual art and social practice art

Archive

Oct
1st
Wed
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Enzo and Sophia writing and illustrating a book (August 2014).

Enzo and Sophia writing and illustrating a book (August 2014).

Sep
29th
Mon
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Do not give them fish all the time, show them how to fish.
Sep
17th
Wed
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Sewing in our neighborhood. She made a little purse in a little more than an hour, and proudly.

Sewing in our neighborhood. She made a little purse in a little more than an hour, and proudly.

Sep
15th
Mon
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"Old age ain’t no place for sissies"

- Bette Davis

(birthday present for a friend)

"Old age ain’t no place for sissies"

- Bette Davis

(birthday present for a friend)

Sep
12th
Fri
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In high schools, the vocational arts have all but vanished. We’ve elevated the importance of “higher education” to such a lofty perch that all other forms of knowledge are now labeled “alternative.” Millions of parents and kids see apprenticeships and on-the-job-training opportunities as “vocational consolation prizes,” best suited for those not cut out for a four-year degree. And still, we talk about millions of “shovel ready” jobs for a society that doesn’t encourage people to pick up a shovel.
— Mike Rowe

(Source: themakegood.com)

Sep
11th
Thu
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putthison:

Boro: The Beauty of Thrift

I’ve become really interested in other forms of textiles lately. Lots of stuff such as Middle Eastern rugs, Navajo weavings, American quilts, and Japanese boro. Boro comes out of Japan’s countrysides, where cloth used to be very precious and valuable. Since disposing things wasn’t an option, the wives of farmers and fishermen would patch and mend bags, blankets, futon covers, clothes, and even diapers. As a result, you get these beautiful objects with hundreds of shades of indigo, often pieced together with a type of rough running stitch known as sashiko

Boro used to be a source of embarrassment for many families, because of its association with poverty, but in more recent times, they’ve become collectors items. If you’re in NYC, you can check some out at Shibui (at least until they move locations in a few weeks) as well as Sri Threads. The second is an appointment-only gallery run by Stephen Szczepanek. You can read an article about him at the New York Times, and check out his wonderful blog, where he posts about the things he’s found in Japan. It’s hard for me to pick a favorite entry, but this one would be a contender. Notice that the stitching forms an interesting geometric pattern across the whole garment. As Stephen writes, those shapes represent masu — a type of wooden box used to measure rice during Japan’s feudal period. 

The price of boro can really range. Sometimes you can find them on eBay for $150-300, but the designs tend to be somewhat simple. Nicer pieces can be found at galleries and speciality auction houses, but in the thousands of dollars. I’m hoping to find a nice, but affordable, piece in the next year, and use it to line the inside of a black leather moto jacket. Fingers crossed. 

(Photos via Sri Threads’ blog)

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On my shelf today

On my shelf today

Sep
10th
Wed
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[A] kimono is made from exactly one bolt of fabric. The way the pattern of a kimono is constructed, not one scrap of fabric remains after the garment is completed. Once the kimono showed signs of wear, it began a long line of transformations - from Sunday best to an everyday item of clothing. When it was further worn, the kimono would be used as a sleeping gown or shortened to make an outdoor jacket. When further worn, the jacket would be turned into a bag or an apron. Finally, layers of scraps were sashiko quilted together into dust cloths. But sashiko was also used to strengthen fabric and in the north, it was used to secure layers of fabric together for protection against the elements. What began as utilitarian stitching began to be used as a decorative element as well and patterns evolved from the daily lives of the quilters.
— Sashiko by Cortney Heimerl

(Source: cortneyheimerl.com)

Sep
9th
Tue
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@zogre in a magical Glitch forest

@zogre in a magical Glitch forest

Sep
8th
Mon
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If you could design your own workspace, your own learning space, what would it look like and why?
Sep
5th
Fri
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One of our Bots.

One of our Bots.

Aug
13th
Wed
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As an affective state, caring is an embodied phenomenon, the product of intellectual and emotional competencies: to care is to be affected by another, to be emotionally at stake in them in some way. As an ethical obligation, to care is to become subject to another, to recognise an obligation to look after another. Finally, as a practical labour, caring requires more from us than abstract well wishing, it requires that we get involved in some concrete way, that we do something (wherever possible) to take care of another.

Thom Van Dooren (via Rogre)

http://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco

(Source: thomvandooren.org)

Aug
12th
Tue
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cinoh:

“Condorito Vase (Greek),” a 2004 work by the Frimkesses. Credit Stephanie Diani for The New York Times

cinoh:

“Condorito Vase (Greek),” a 2004 work by the Frimkesses. Credit Stephanie Diani for The New York Times

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Flowers for a four-year-old girl.

Flowers for a four-year-old girl.

Aug
11th
Mon
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Made a knitting basket as a gift for an 89 year old grandma. Stuffed it with homespun t-shirt yarn to give her something different and cooler to hold in her hands (during a heat wave). One of our many side projects…