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grecolaborativo

art collaboration, textile art, costumes, installations, video, conceptual art and social practice art

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Jun
6th
Fri
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Jun
3rd
Tue
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robertogreco:

Untitled, Sophia Greco, 2014


  The idea behind my entry for the MCASD 25 and Under contest was set off by a conversation about how language affects culture and the way we perceive (or see) the world. This happens in ways both small (for example, the way verbs and tense are used) and large (for example, how some Australian Aboriginal languages have no term for “left” and “right” and instead, everything is spoken about using terms for cardinal directions - “north”, “south”, “east”, and “west”.)
  
  These ideas led me to ask a question. The traditional Snellen chart, which you will likely recognize, is used by many to measure visual acuity. How is it different in countries that do not primarily use the Latin alphabet, and what does it look like? Starting from the top and going clockwise, the languages used in the Snellen eye charts are as follows: Hebrew, Cyrillic, Chinese, Korean, English, Japanese, Cherokee and Arabic/Urdu. Finally, in the center of my creation is a chart often used to test astigmatism. Astigmatism is a very common eye condition that causes blurred vision.
  
  For more information about these interactions between language and perception, see the work of Lera Boroditsky.


This work will be on display with the other 24 finalists at MCASD's Downtown location on Saturday, June 7 from 2:00-4:00 pm. For more information see 25 and Under Showcase.

robertogreco:

Untitled, Sophia Greco, 2014

The idea behind my entry for the MCASD 25 and Under contest was set off by a conversation about how language affects culture and the way we perceive (or see) the world. This happens in ways both small (for example, the way verbs and tense are used) and large (for example, how some Australian Aboriginal languages have no term for “left” and “right” and instead, everything is spoken about using terms for cardinal directions - “north”, “south”, “east”, and “west”.)

These ideas led me to ask a question. The traditional Snellen chart, which you will likely recognize, is used by many to measure visual acuity. How is it different in countries that do not primarily use the Latin alphabet, and what does it look like? Starting from the top and going clockwise, the languages used in the Snellen eye charts are as follows: Hebrew, Cyrillic, Chinese, Korean, English, Japanese, Cherokee and Arabic/Urdu. Finally, in the center of my creation is a chart often used to test astigmatism. Astigmatism is a very common eye condition that causes blurred vision.

For more information about these interactions between language and perception, see the work of Lera Boroditsky.

This work will be on display with the other 24 finalists at MCASD's Downtown location on Saturday, June 7 from 2:00-4:00 pm. For more information see 25 and Under Showcase.

Jun
2nd
Mon
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Sometimes the player created a small, private world that was soft and warm and simple. Sometimes hard, and cold, and complicated.
— The Game That Conquered the World. What is the appeal of Minecraft? It’s the limitless creation of one’s own reality by James Parker (via @faketv)

(Source: The Atlantic)

May
29th
Thu
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California Rorschach

California Rorschach

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Chinafornia

Chinafornia

May
28th
Wed
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Renate Müller: Toys + Design

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Honoring the tradition of German toymakers from the 1800s, Renate Müller is renowned for her handmade jute-and-leather toys—typically animals—which she began designing and producing in the early 1960s. Müller has spent her life in Sonneberg, Germany, which was once the epicenter of world toy manufacture. From an early age, she helped out in her family’s toy factory and later became a student at the Sonneberg Polytechnic for Toy Design, where she was encouraged by a teacher to create toy animals that could be used therapeutically for children with physical and mental handicaps. Inspired by this endeavor, Müller began to create the brightly colored, multi-sized menagerie she is known for today—such as seals, elephants, giraffes, and bears—which debuted at the 1967 Leipzig Trade Fair and were tested (and deemed successful) by German psychiatric hospitals and clinics.

Honoring the tradition of German toymakers from the 1800s, Renate Müller is renowned for her handmade jute-and-leather toys—typically animals—which she began designing and producing in the early 1960s. Müller has spent her life in Sonneberg, Germany, which was once the epicenter of world toy manufacture. From an early age, she helped out in her family’s toy factory and later became a student at the Sonneberg Polytechnic for Toy Design, where she was encouraged by a teacher to create toy animals that could be used therapeutically for children with physical and mental handicaps. Inspired by this endeavor, Müller began to create the brightly colored, multi-sized menagerie she is known for today—such as seals, elephants, giraffes, and bears—which debuted at the 1967 Leipzig Trade Fair and were tested (and deemed successful) by German psychiatric hospitals and clinics.

May
14th
Wed
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A mis-printed jet-pack bunny is so much trash (unless I buy a second machine like a Filabot to remelt my filament). A mis-sewn seam can be ripped out and redone. An old dress can be refashioned into a new one. A favorite vintage piece can be copied. Sewing does not create more waste but, potentially, less, and the process of sewing is filled with opportunities for increasing one’s skills and doing it over as well as doing it yourself. What are quilts, after all, but a clever way to use every last scrap of precious fabric?
— 3D Printers Have a Lot to Learn from Sewing Machines by Alexandra Lange (via Dezeen)

(Source: dezeen.com)

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One And Only Dolly

One And Only Dolly

May
12th
Mon
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Word from the wise…

Word from the wise

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We work well with others.
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What do you see in this shapes?

What do you see in this shapes?

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Grecolaborativo is a full-family collaboration, a couple creating textile art, costumes, installations, video, conceptual art, and social practice art with their teenage daughter and son. We are feral teachers, transdisciplinary learners, internet librarians, and idea sommeliers. We ask a lot of questions. We make things. We are comfortable in studios, museums, libraries, and classrooms. We love to play. We work well with others. We enjoy long walks, exploring, and conversation. We appreciate the slow and the small. We speak Spanish and English.
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C working on her two-tone star.
Part of our One And Only project.

C working on her two-tone star.

Part of our One And Only project.

May
6th
Tue
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When my hands are busy, my mind is at peace. I can have conversations with my friends, family, the other people in the waiting room while I applique away. I like to make and it allows me to squeeze in a little bit of making time when life is busy and time is short. Most obviously, it’s fabric and thread - two of my favorite things.